Fall Colors on the Tenn-Tom

Fall is our favorite time of the year, surrounded by colorful trees and cool temperatures.

TTW3

The Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway is known locally as the “Tenn-Tom.” Why? Because it’s a lot easier to remember, especially for people of a certain silver age.

TTW

This week we opted to be “on the hook” with Sea Trek at four (4) locations along the Tenn-Tom.

 Whiten Lock – anchorage

SeaTrek

For us, anchoring out is akin to glamour camping, or “glamping.” since we eat under a star-filled sky, surrounded by the sounds of nature.

WhitenSunset

When you don’t have tv distractions, it’s a great time to play Train Dominoes.

TrainDominos

Thanks Marty and Anders for introducing us to this lively game. As you can see, Beverly won this round.

GloverWilkens

Glover Wilkens Dam – anchorage

Pipework4Sam
Pipe Work Southern Style for Sam.

Columbus, MS

ColumbusRainbow
Rainbow at Columbus, it’s a good sign, MO.

Look, Trevor, at the marina in Columbus we found a North Pacific Sedan!

NPYSedan
Morgan and Marty Toland, Elizabeth

Locking with Loopers

We departed Columbus with a flotilla, six Loopers including us.

LockingTT6

Wondering if this is Clark Kent country … that might explain the strategic location of this phone booth.

PhoneBooth4Superman
A tribute to Superman.

Windham Landing – anchorage

We enjoyed yet another beautiful night with Sea Trek.

SunsetRick

White Cliffs, Alabama

Who exactly was “Tom Bigbee?”  As we approached the majestic White Cliffs, we had plenty of time to research the burning question.

WhiteCliff2

Expecting the answer to be a southern gentlemen or a politician influential enough to have his name on a 234-mile commercial channel with ten locks and dams, Wikipedia provided another American history lesson.

WhiteCliffAlabama

During the 17th century, the gentle winding river formed the eastern boundary of the Choctaw lands. In the 1830’s, President Andrew Jackson signed a forced migration of the Native Americans into law. Aptly named, Tombigbee is a Choctaw term meaning box maker or coffin maker, a somber reminder of the devastating Indian Removal.

Rattlesnake cutoff – anchorage

Thanks to Sea Trek, patrol for the night was a welcomed alien.

RattleSnake

Thanks for the ride to shore, Capt Bruce.  We enjoyed anchoring out with y’all.

MaddieTransit
Bruce Peck, ‘lil SeaTrek, another happy taxi ride for Maddie.

Unicorns are more than magical!

A special shout out to Maureen O, who provided this week’s trivia:  the unicorn is the official animal of Scotland! Now that’s a country that appreciates good libations. If you doubt the power of a unicorn – here’s the official word from National Geographic:

ScotlandUnicornDrinks
Of course, unicorns drink martinis!

Next up: finishing the Tennessee –Tombigbee Waterway 

Where Have We Been So Far? Thanks for asking 🙂

Total Locks completed = 146 plus 2 dams, includes:

  • Florida – Lake Okeechobee area: 7
  • Virginia – Great Dismal Swamp: 2
  • New York – Troy & Champlain Canal: 12
  • CANADA – Chambly Canal/Quebec: 9
  • CANADA – Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway: 5
  • CANADA – Rideau Canal/Ontario: 47
  • CANADA – Trent-Severn Waterway: 44
  • Illinois – Calumet, Illinois and Ohio Rivers: 8 plus 2 dams (wickets thrown down)
  • Kentucky – Kentucky Lake Lock and Dam: 1
  • Tennessee – Pickwick Lock and Dam: 1
  • Tenn-Tombigbee Waterway: 10

States and Provinces traversed on the water, commencing March 1, 2018:

Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama (18)

Canada Provinces (June 10 – August 9): Quebec, Ontario (2).

Side trips (via train, plane or automobile):

Los Angeles (MS [3 – April, May & Sept], Rick [4 – May, June, July, Sept] & Maddie [2 – May, Sept], Cleveland (RMG, MS & Maddie [2- April and July], Craig [April]), St. Charles, St. Louis, and Chattanooga (with B & B), Lookout Mountain & Missionary Ridge, TN by train (with B & B)

Author: Exhale49

North Pacific Trawler

2 thoughts on “Fall Colors on the Tenn-Tom”

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